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Experts Reveal Poison Oak Rash Symptoms and Treatment Options

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If you’ve been for a hike and came back with a rash that looked angry Keep this in mind.

The leg is itchy after you’ve been outside for a long time maybe working at your backyard or on through a forest. If you look down and see an itchy red rash that has formed on the rear portion of the leg it becomes apparent that you’ve come into contact with a poisonous plant and have suffered some kind of allergic reaction.

Poison oakand poison Ivy as well as poison sumac, are three most commonly used plants that can cause skin irritations or itchy rashes. The poisonous plant reactions affect nearly 50 million Americans every year, as per the American Skin Association (ASA) as 83% of the US population is sensitive to the oils that is produced from the sap of these plants.

It can be difficult to determine what plant causes an itch on your body, particularly when you don’t know what you came in contact with. This article will help you be aware of regarding rashes caused by poison oak as well as symptoms and solutions.

Poison oak is one of the plants that can cause a rash if it comes in close contact.

Based on the US Food and Drug Administration The poison oak is low-growing plants in the southern and eastern United States, but it can also be found in huge groups or in long vines on the Pacific Coast (FDA). The plant has “fuzzy green leaves” that form three-leaf clusters and also yellow-white fruits.

The sap that comes from poison oak plants, as the poison ivy and sumac, is the reason for the allergic reaction that occurs within a matter of hours to days after contact. Debra Jaliman MD an experienced dermatologist who is board-certified and an assistant clinical dermatologist of the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, tells Health that the plant releases an oil known as urushiol which may cause an allergic reaction in those who are sensitive.

Based on Joshua Zeichner, MD, director of clinical and cosmetic research within dermatology Mount Sinai Hospital, “when your skin comes into contact with the plant’s leaves, the urushiol hits the skin and provokes an immunological reaction.”

In the words of the ASA it is colorless and odourless, so it’s difficult to know if you’ve been exposed (the one way to determine is when you notice a rash). It’s also important to remember that you don’t need to be in close proximity to poison oak in order to get the rash. You could be exposed to it by touching anything or something else with. Based on Dr. Jaliman when your pet comes in close contact with the poisonous oak or any other plants that contain urushiol, they may transmit it to you via their fur.

What are the symptoms and signs that are indicative of the poison oak?

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As per the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention the most commonly reported sign of exposure to poison oak (or similar plants) is the appearance of a red rash within a couple of days of the contact (CDC). “The rash usually appears in streaks because it only appears where the leaves brush against the skin,” Dr. Zeichner explains. “However, if you touch the urushiol-exposed portions of skin with your hands, you can transfer it to other parts of the body.”

The rashes can occur in phases too. “At first, the rash appears as red, itchy lumps on the skin,” Dr. Jaliman describes. “It will then become blistered and crusty.” In the words of the ASA poison oak rash can last for up 2 weeks to heal if there isn’t an infection.

Although the majority of people will only experience an itchy, red skin rash, a fraction of the population could experience an extreme allergic reaction (10 percent – 15 per cent of US population is extremely sensitive to urushiol according to the ASA). If you notice one of the symptoms listed above as per the American Academy of Dermatology Association (AADA) it is possible that you are experiencing a potentially dangerous reaction to poison oak. It is recommended to get medical attention as soon as possible:

What are the warning signs and symptoms that are indicative of the poison oak?

Based on the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention the most frequent sign of exposure to poison oak (or similar plants) is the appearance of a red rash within a couple of days of the contact (CDC). “The rash usually appears in streaks because it only appears where the leaves brush against the skin,” Dr. Zeichner explains. “However, if you touch the urushiol-exposed portions of skin with your hands, you can transfer it to other parts of the body.”

What is the most effective way to prevent and treat the rash of poison oak?

Based on Dr. Jaliman, the very first thing to do in case you are concerned that you’ve been exposed to poison oak is to clean your skin thoroughly using the soap as well as water. This prevents it from moving to different areas in your body.

Dr. Jaliman suggests cool compresses, or a short bath, with a lukewarm liquid that contains colloidal oatmeal to help with itching, something you do not need to do. To reduce irritation and itching Our specialists recommend applying topical ointments like OTC cortisone creams or Calamine lotion. Dr. Jaliman suggests antihistamines such as Benadryl to reduce allergic reactions. Dr. Zeichner recommends Vaseline to help soothe and heal inflamed areas.

Oral steroids are used when there is a severe allergic reaction as per the Dr. Stevenson. If the rash is severe, contact a dermatologist who can provide prescription-strength lotions or medications. “You may take prednisone and get rid of this rash in a few days to a week,” Dr. Jaliman elaborates.

Prevention of rashes caused by poison oak however is the first option for protection. “Know how to recognize the plant and avoid the rash. If you’re planning go to a forest place, be sure to properly dressed “Dr. Zeichner suggests. Ivy blockers, such as Ivy X, are also suggested from Dr. Jaliman as these products “create a barrier on your skin, making it tougher to acquire the rash.”

Dr. Jaliman suggests cleaning all objects that be in contact with the plants and could bring the oils inside and also to protect barrier and layer.

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